Courses of Interest

The courses listed in this section have been chosen by the designated departments as having special interest for students who are not majoring in that particular subject but who might find courses in that discipline both enjoyable and beneficial. For more information, contact the department directly.

School of Cinematic Arts

ANIMATION

CTAN 200g The Rise of Digital Hollywood (4 units)

Description: An overview of the evolution of computer graphics in modern media.

CTAN 330 Animation Fundamentals (2 units)

Description: An introduction to the fundamentals of animation, covering such topics as timing, anticipation, reaction, overlapping action, and metamorphosis.

CTAN 420 Concept Design for Animation (2 units)

Description: Creating characters and environments for animation, live action, and video games.

CTAN 432 The World of Visual Effects (2 units)

Description: Introduction to the expanding field of visual effects; topics include integration for cinematic storytelling and the study of digital productions employing the latest visual effects.

CTAN 436 Writing for Animation (2 units)

Description: Workshop exploring concept and structure of long and short form animated films through practical writing exercises.

CTAN 448 Introduction to Film Graphics – Animation (4 units)

Description: An introduction to methods for creating analog animation through experimentation with imagery, concepts and materials. Emphasis on basic timing principles and hands-on techniques.

CTAN 450a Animation Theory and Techniques (2 units)

Description: Methods for creating animation blending traditional techniques with contemporary technologies.

CTAN 452 Introduction to 3-D Computer Animation (2 units)

Description: Lecture and laboratory in computer animation: geometric modeling, motion specification, lighting, texture mapping, rendering, compositing, production techniques, systems for computer-synthesized animation.

CTAN 460 Character Design Workshop (2 units)

Description: The basics of character design for animation: anatomy, poses, facial expressions, silhouettes, and anthropomorphism. Development of a portfolio.

CTAN 462 Visual Effects (2 units)

Description: Survey of contemporary concepts and approaches to production in the current state of film and video effects work. Digital and traditional methodologies will be covered, with a concentration on digital exercises illustrating modern techniques.

CTAN 465L Digital Effects Animation (2 units)

Description: All aspects of digital effects animation, including particles, dynamics, and fluids. Creating water, fire, explosions, and destruction in film. Prerequisite: CTAN 452 or CTAN 462.

Includes an introduction to the rich procedural capabilities of Houdini, the standard application used in the industry for effects animation. The course will encompass a series of hands-on exercises, so a prior basic working knowledge of Maya or other 3-D application is essential.

CTAN 470 Documentary Animation Production (2 units)

Description: Examination of the history, techniques, and methods of documentary animation production. Collaboration on a short film project.

CTAN 495 Visual Music (2 units)

Description: Experimental animation providing the opportunity to produce individual or group projects. Focus is non-conventional techniques for image creation and collaboration between composer and visual artist. Not open to freshmen and sophomores.

CTAN 499 Special Topics Real-Time Animation (2 units)

Description: This class will focus on using Unreal Engine as a creative tool for visual storytelling and real-time rendering. The class will have an emphasis on the ease of which we can create complex, compelling and dynamic scenes and manipulate them in real-time making creative decisions instantaneous.
Recommended Preparation: Familiarity with any 3D application, a PC compatible computer or laptop with a Nvidia graphics card.

CTAN 502L Experiments in Immersive Design (2 units)

Description: An in-depth exploration of aesthetics and techniques involved in the conceptualization, design and creation of immersive media and stereoscopic imaging. (Duplicates credit in former CTAN 502a.)

CTAN 503 Storyboarding for Animation (2 units)

Description: Focus on film grammar, perspective, and layout, staging and acting as it relates to storyboarding for animation.

CTAN 504L Creative Production in Virtual Reality (2 units)

Description: A creative studio course in producing both a linear cinematic virtual reality short film and associated real-time immersive experience. Prerequisite: CTAN 502

CTAN 508L Live Action Integration with Visual Effects (2 units)

Description: Survey of the digital techniques required to successfully marry live action shooting with CGI elements and green screen footage. Prerequisite: CTAN 462

CTAN 524 Contemporary Topics in Animation and Digital Arts (2 units)

Description: Topics exploring the evolution of the brain, development of art, technology, science and culture. How this correlates to the evolution of animation-digital media.

CTAN 536 Storytelling for Animation (2 units)

Description: Storytelling workshop for animators; application of dramatic techniques to visual concepts to derive three-dimensional stories which can serve as bases for finished films.

CTAN 550 Stop Motion Puppet and Set Design (2 units)

Description: Puppet and set design for stop motion animation while providing guidance on armature rigs that allow the character to be animated effectively.

CTAN 564L Motion Capture Fundamentals (2 units)

Description: Fundamental principles of motion capture technology explored while working through a structured series of assignments based around performance, gesture and motion. Prerequisite: CTAN 452 or CTAN 462

CTAN 599 Special Topics 3D Motion Graphic Design (2 units)

Description: The focus of this class is on 3d motion graphic design and animation.
The objective is that students learn to create well-designed work by combining visual
communication and design thinking with software skill learning.
Recommended Preparation: experience with Maya or Cinema 4D 3-D animation software.

CINEMATIC ARTS

CNTV 522 The Television Industry: Networks, Cable and the Internet (4 units)

Description: The current state of the television industry and future business paradigms.
This course will cover a comprehensive look into the television industry, including the conception, development, and selling of an idea, as well as how networks, cable companies, internet, and mobile platforms operate.

CNTV 524 Digital Technologies and the Entertainment Industry (4 units)

Description: The impact of digital technologies on the film, television, and music industries from content creation to distribution. This class will explain the impact that various “disruptive” technologies from digital cinema to mobile technology to video games to RSS feeds are having (or are about to have) on the entire media value chain. The focus will be on content creation to distribution in the film, television, and music industries.
Professors: Paul Bricault, David Baron

CNTV 562 Seminar in Motion Picture Business (4 units)

Description: Problems of studio operation, production, distribution, exhibition or legal procedures relating to the motion picture.
The theatrical motion picture and television businesses from the studio’s perspective, with an emphasis on feature films. Guest speakers will discuss creative development, production, post-production, marketing, distribution, business affairs, deal analysis, film finance, tax-based incentive deals, etc.
Professor: Robert M. Osher

CNTV 563 The Business of Representation (4 units)

Description: Various roles an agent, manager, attorney and publicist play in representing talent, producers and writers. Taught by professionals who are at the forefront of the entertainment industry.
Professor: Daniel A. Sussman

CINEMA AND MEDIA STUDIES

CTCS 190g Introduction to Cinema (4 units)

Description: Rated one of the top six USC classes you cannot afford to miss, and now fulfilling the General Education requirement, this course explores the formal properties of movies: literary design, performance, visual design, composition (framing/staging/ photographing), editing, sound design, genre, style and the production process – that is how movies work and how they should be consumed. A perennial favorite, CTCS 190 fills fast. Screenings include: Singin’ in the Rain, The Two Faces of January, Sudden Fear, Hidden Figures, Victor/Victoria, Whiplash, The Shawshank Redemption, Casablanca, His Girl Friday, Lover Come Back, Two for the Road, Moonstruck, A Passage to India. Screenings in 35mm film and/or DCP. Open to all majors. This course fulfills the general education requirement. You must also register for a discussion section.
Professor: George Carstocea

CTCS 191 Introduction to Television and Video (4 units)

Description: Exploration of the economic, technological, aesthetic, and ideological characteristics of the televisual medium; study of historical development of television and video including analysis of key works; introduction to TV/Video theory and criticism.
Professor: Ellen Seiter

CTCS 192gm Race, Class, and Gender in American Film (4 units)

Description: This course surveys the representation of issues related to race, class, and gender in American film. The class further investigates the ways that Hollywood cinema functions socially, culturally, and politically. Focusing on historical representation as well as contemporary images, the course looks to explain the role of cinema in creating and influencing perceptions around issues of American identity. This course satisfies USC’s General Education requirement. Screenings to include: Do the Right Thing (1989), Silence of the Lambs (1991), Zero Dark Thirty (2012), Get Out (2017), When They See Us (2019), Queen and Slim (2019), Be Water (2020) among other titles.
This course satisfies the university’s diversity requirement and new GE Arts requirement.
Professor: Todd E. Boyd

CTCS 411 Film, Television and Cultural Studies (4 units)

Description: Detailed examination of film/television from the perspectives and insights of Cultural Studies; focus on the production and reception of cultural texts, practices, and communities.
This seminar/workshop explores the connection between photography and filmmaking. Innovation and disruption will be key themes of this course. Film screenings will include documentaries, feature films and television programs featuring the work of artists such as Annie Leibovitz, David Hockney, Vivian Maier, Juliano Riberio Salgado, and Robert Mapplethorpe among others. The course will require students to have access to a digital camera as workshops, challenges and photo essays are an important part of the course design.
Professor: Bill Whittington

CTCS 412 Gender, Sexuality and Media (4 units)

Description: Examines how gender and sexuality are figured in cinema and television with an emphasis on the development of feminist media theory.

CTCS 464 Film and/or Television Genres (4 units)

Description: Rigorous examination of film genres: history, aesthetics, cultural context, social significance, and critical methodologies.

CTCS 466 Theatrical Film Symposium (4 units)

Description: Theatrical Film Symposium, taught by world-renowned film critic Leonard Maltin, brings you face-to-face with leading film directors, writers, producers, and actors working today. Each week, students watch sneak previews of upcoming movies, followed by exclusive Q&As with the creative teams behind the films. Past semester screenings included Coco, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Colossal, Life, Land of Mine, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, The Shape of Water, American Made, and Thor: Ragnarok. Recent guests include Damien Chazelle, Adam Scott, Scott Derrickson, Taika Waititi, Lee Unkrich, JJ Abrams, James Franco, Jeff Nichols, Sylvester Stallone, Ryan Coogler, Bryan Cranston, Patricia Riggen, Charlie Kaufman, Atom Egoyan, Kevin Feige, and Judd Apatow.
Professor: Leonard Maltin​

CTCS 467 Television Symposium (4 units)

Description: Lectures and readings on creative problems in the motion picture industry; current films; interviews with visiting producers, directors, writers, performers.
Modeled after the popular Leonard Maltin course, Theatrical Film Symposium, the Cinema and Media Studies department offers an exciting counterpart focusing on the television industry, taught by Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic Mary McNamara Each week, students are shown selected television programming, followed by a moderated Q&A with guests from the show, often including the series creator.
Professor: Mary McNamara

CTCS 469 Film and/or Television Style Analysis (4 units)

Description: Intensive study of the style of an auteur, studio, film or television making mode in terms of thematic and formal properties and their influences upon the art of film.
Professor: Nitin Govil

CTCS 494 Advanced Cinema and Media Studies Seminar (4 units)

Description: Rotating topics involving detailed study of the historical, cultural and aesthetic analysis of film, television, and new media technologies.
Professor: Ayesha Omer

INTERACTIVE MEDIA

CTIN 464 Game Studies Seminar (4 units)

Description: Rigorous examination of interactive entertainment: genres, history, aesthetics, cultural context, and social significance. Topics vary by semester.

An exploration of what makes a good game, with weekly discussions featuring the top creators of the games you love. Perfect for students who are passionate about games but may not have much experience beyond playing them, assignments in this class revolve around playing games so that students can discuss their experiences when the developers visit. Students in this class receive free games, as well as a free Playstation 4 to play them on.

CTIN 488 Game Design Workshop (4 units)

Description: An introduction to making games. Students will explore the principles of game design through the entirely analog creation of card, board and tabletop games.

In this project-driven course, students learn the entire interactive design process through the lens of board games they have crafted themselves. Called “the most intense arts and crafts class at USC,” students will exit with a professionally printed product. CTIN 488 is the prerequisite for all advanced design classes.

CTIN 499 Special Topics (2 units)

Description: Detailed investigation of new or emerging aspects of cinema, television, and/or interactive media; special subjects offered by visiting faculty; experimental subjects.

Worldbuilding for Augmented Reality. An exploration of AR, taught alongside Niantic Labs, creators of Pokemon Go Open to creators from all disciplines, this class will focus on the creation of content for the Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality spaces. With guidance from Niantic Labs, this is the perfect class for students interested in exploring the field. No technical experience needed: Cinema Sudents Highly Encouraged.

MEDIA ARTS AND PRACTICE

IML 140 Workshop in Multimedia Authoring (2 units)

Description: Introduction to the expressive potential of multimedia as a critical and creative tool, supplementing traditional forms of academic work. Introduction to image, video, audio and web authoring in a variety of different topic areas such as storytelling, remix, mindfulness, and marketing. This course counts as a requirement for the minor in Digital Studies and the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program.

IML 201 The Languages of Digital Media (4 units)

Description: An in-depth investigation of the close interrelationships among technology, culture and communication to form a solid foundation for digital authoring. Duplicates credit in former IML 101.
Students will produce a series of media projects that explore and strengthen their personal voice and critical consciousness. This course counts as a requirement for the minor in Digital Studies and the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program.

IML 309 Integrative Design for Mobile Devices (4 units)

Description: Hands-on investigation of opportunities and challenges offered by mobile interaction within both cultural and ideological contexts.
Students will explore tablets, phones, and mobile-responsive websites while also learning about user experience and user interface design. This course counts as an elective for the Digital Studies and Future Cinema minors, and for the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program.

IML 365 Future Cinema (4 units)

Description: Examination of the history of cinematic experimentation to provide a framework for understanding contemporary virtual reality, augmented reality, interactive installations and large-scale urban screens.
This course counts as an elective for the Digital Studies and Future Cinema minors, and for the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program.

IML 420 New Media for Social Change (4 units)

Description: Creating real social change through multimedia, working in collaboration with a local nonprofit organization. Students explore the nature of civic engagement and strengthen their digital media skills in the pursuit of real world change. Counts as a requirement for the minors in Digital Studies and Media and Social Change.

IML 422 Information Visualization (4 units)

Description: Visualizing information through diverse media platforms, with a focus on critical analysis and hands-on visualization. Students will explore the technical and conceptual aspects of using data to create diagrams, infographics, charts, wayfinding systems, interactive media, journalism, and art. Counts as a requirement for the minor in Digital Studies.

IML 475 Media Arts Research Lab (2 units)

Description: Media Arts Research Lab is a specialized course that is taught in conjunction with one of SCA’s many research labs and/or research initiatives. The goal of the course is to give students some exposure to the innovative work being done at SCA. Participating labs include the Mobile and Environmental Media Lab, the Mixed Reality Lab and the World Building Media Lab. Counts as a requirement for the minors in Digital Studies and Future Cinema.

IML 477 Embodied Storytelling and Immersive Docu-Narratives (4 units)

Description: Examination of art, media, and theatre, to create an immersive, installation-based intervention utilizing the embodied 360-degree docu-narrative form.
This course counts as an elective for the Digital Studies, Future Cinema and Media and Social Change minors, and for the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship program.

PRODUCTION

CTPR 288 Originating and Developing Ideas for Film (2 units)

Description: Exercises in observation, imaginative association, visualization, etc., that deepen the creative process, leading to ideas, stories, characters, and images for narrative, documentary, and experimental films.

CTPR 327 Motion Picture Cinematography (3 units)

Description: Use of high definition motion picture equipment to explore the fundamentals of shot design, movement and lighting. In class group projects.

The magic of creating images on film, from using cameras, lenses, and filters to photographic processes and the role of cinematography in interpreting story. Hands-on projects put theory into practice.

CTPR 335 Motion Picture Editing (3 units)

Description: Theory, techniques, and practices in picture editing; use of standard editing equipment; individual projects.

CTPR 340 Creating the Motion Picture Sound Track (2 units)

Description: Techniques and aesthetics for recording production sound, editing dialogue, sound effects, music, Foley and preparing for the mix. For film, television, and other media.

CTPR 371 Directing for Television (4 units)

Description: Preparation of director’s preproduction blockout; study of direction for live, tape, and film production, for both dramatic and informational television.

Students will work in teams creating short scenes in various formats, including traditional episodic and situational comedy. The directorial role as production leader and visionary is emphasized.

CTPR 385 Colloquium: Motion Picture Production Techniques (4 units)

Description: Basic procedures and techniques applicable to production of all types of films; demonstration by production of a short film from conception to completion.

Includes writing of the script to planning, shooting, and editing.

CTPR 386 Art and Industry of the Theatrical Film (4 units)

Description: Detailed analysis of one theatrical film from conception through critical reception to develop an understanding of motion pictures as art, craft, and industry.

The course studies the anatomy of a film by examining a major current release with guest speakers involved in the making of a production. Films previously studied include The Avengers and The Sessions.

CTPR 409 Practicum in Television Production (2, 4 units)

Description: Television production: laboratory course covers operating cameras, creating graphics, technical operations, controlling audio and floor-managing live productions. Students plan and produce actual Trojan Vision programs.

CTPR 410 The Movie Business: From Story Concept to Exhibition (2 units)

Description: Examination of the industry from story ideas, through script development, production and exhibition; evaluation of roles played by writers, agents, studio executives, marketing and publicity.

Guest speakers and lectures discuss and cover the role of the writer, agent, studio executive, producer, director, as well as address the topics of marketing, publicity, and distribution.

CTPR 422 Makeup for Motion Pictures (2 units)

Description: Lecture-laboratory in makeup relating it to mood of the story and emulsion of the camera stock.

An introduction to the craft of makeup for film, TV, and other media. Students learn through lectures, demos, and hands-on workshops the different kinds of makeup styles and procedures, including the study of glamour, old age, gore, fantasy, and prosthetic techniques.

CTPR 423 Introduction to Special Effects in Cinema (2 units)

Description: Introductory workshop in the aesthetics and practices of special effects, embracing both the classical and contemporary modes.

The class focuses on techniques, cost, and operational characteristics. For aspiring production managers, directors, and camera and effects specialists. Conducted in a workshop environment where students experience the complexities involved with techniques in use industry-wide.

CTPR 425 Production Planning (2 units)

Description: Theory, discussion, and practical application of production planning during preproduction and production of a film.

CTPR 426 The Production Experience (2 units)

Description: To provide students with basic working knowledge of both the skills of the motion picture set and production operations through classroom lectures and hands-on experience.

Students learn the fundamentals of episodic TV drama and participate in the shooting of an episode written and directed by students. Positions available in producing, camera, sound, production design, or editorial.

CTPR 431 Developing the Documentary Production (2 units)

Description: The tools and skills necessary to turn an idea into a documentary story, using sample reels, pitches, and writing to develop a professional proposal.

Course is designed to teach students the knowledge, skills, insight and judgment needed to research, develop and create pitch materials for a documentary production.

CTPR 454 Acting for Film and Television (4 units)

Description: Intensive examination of skills and techniques necessary for successful performances in film and television. Practical application through in-class exercises and assigned projects.

CTPR 456 Introduction to Art Direction (2 units)

Description: Introduction to drafting, set design, set decoration and creating models for students with diverse abilities. Guest lectures, group discussions and hands-on workshop.

CTPR 458 Organizing Creativity: Entertainment Industry Decision Making (2 units)

Description: Analysis of the unique structures in the entertainment industry for organizing and managing creativity. Students research and chart pathways to leadership. Open only to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Students will learn how to face challenges and opportunities as they launch their careers in the entertainment industry. The class examines the industry’s ever-evolving creative and business
structures through lectures and dialogue with expert guest speakers.

CTPR 460 Film Business Procedures and Distribution (2, 4 units)

Description: Financing, budgeting, management as applied to films; problems of distribution, including merchandising, cataloging, evaluation, and film library management.

Students are introduced to film economics, as it relates to production, distribution, and exhibition.

CTPR 461 Managing Television Stations and Internet Media (2 units)

Description: Managing electronic media, including radio and television stations, broadcast and cable networks, and the internet.

Executives from all areas of the TV industry address class each week to provide first-hand information about a wide range or areas, including news production,
sales, marketing, and syndication.

CTPR 470 Practicum in On-Screen Direction of Actors (2 units)

Description: Concentration on the basic skills in working with actors from a director’s point of view.

Students learn to experiment and discuss the many choices in directing actors, including laboratory and scene analysis. The course also breaks down a script from the emotional point-of-view of the actor.

CTPR 474 Documentary Production (2 units)

Description: Pairs produce, direct, shoot, and edit a short documentary on a subject of their choice. Finished projects will be suitable for broadcast/festivals.

Students are encouraged to form pairs before class; individual students form partnerships at the beginning of the term. Students must come prepared with two to three documentary ideas.
Finished films will be approximately fifteen minutes in length.

CTPR 499 Documentary Production (2 units)

Description: Pairs produce, direct, shoot, and edit a short documentary on a subject of their choice. Finished projects will be suitable for broadcast/festivals.

Internet Famous: How to Jumpstart Your Career using YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok (3 units)
Learn how to translate storytelling into short form comedy that will stand out online. Students explore newer avenues, such as YouTube, IGTV and TikTok as outlets for their creative voices with projects they will write, direct and perform in.

WRITING

CTWR 409 Fundamentals of Screenwriting: Character, Conflict, and Story (4 units)

Description: Introduction to writing compelling scenes, creating authentic characters, three act structure, and feature film outlining.

CTWR 411 Television Script Analysis (2 units)

Description: In-depth analysis of the craft of writing prime-time episodic television. Examination of situation comedies and dramas through weekly screenings and lectures.

CTWR 422 Creating the Dramatic Television Series (2 units)

Description: Examination and creation of the world, characters, and concept for an original hour-long dramatic series. Writing an outline for an original dramatic pilot.

CTWR 430 Comedy Writers and Their Work (2 units)

Description: Detailed investigation of specific comedy writers, comedy genres, and the works they’ve influenced. Lectures include screenings and visiting screenwriters.

CTWR 431 Screenwriters and Their Work (2 units)

Description: Detailed investigation of specific comedy writers, comedy genres, and the works they’ve influenced. Lectures include screenings and visiting screenwriters.

CTWR 432 Television Writers and Their Work (2 units)

Description: Detailed investigation of various television writers’ styles, the worlds they have created, and the works they’ve influenced. Lectures include screenings and visiting television writers.

CTWR 516 Advanced Motion Picture Script Analysis (2 units)

Description: Critical analysis of the structure of films from the classics to current award winners. Students will learn how to identify key story concepts and break down three act structure in finished films and scripts.

CTWR 523 Introduction to the Screenplay (4 units)

Description: Introduction to formal elements of the screenplay through lectures and the workshopping of a complete first draft of a feature-length script. Prerequisite: CTAN 536 or CTWR 505 or CTWR 518.
Recommended preparation: CTWR 516.

Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

JOURNALISM

JOUR 201 Culture of Journalism: Past, Present and Future (4 units)

Description: Understanding key moments, debates and ideas that have shaped journalism in the United States from the Revolutionary War period through today. Examination of the social, cultural, political and technological aspects of journalism and its impact on the profession and public service.

JOUR 210x Basics of News Production for Non-Majors (2 units)

Description: Introduction to television, radio, and/or digital news production. Examination of issues in journalism. Graded CR/NC.

JOUR 300 Journalism and Society (4 units)

Description: Examination of media and society by applying concepts on power, ideology, discourse and representation to specific case studies from the field and practice of journalism.

JOUR 330 Photojournalism (4 units)

Description: Emphasis on fundamental skills necessary for photojournalism including camera techniques, story ideas and digital darkroom.

JOUR 375 The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture (4 units)

Description: The impact of conflicting images of reporters in movies and television on the American public’s perception of newsgatherers in the 20th century. A decade-by-decade evaluation.

JOUR 380 Sports, Business and Media in Today’s Society (4 units)

Description: An inside look at the important stories, topical issues, trends and historical developments related to the growing influence of business and media on college and professional sports; identifying the key components and meeting the influencers in class that help shape the business side of sports, while recognizing the role the media plays in providing daily coverage across multiple platforms.

JOUR 381 Entertainment, Business and Media in Today’s Society (4 units)

Description: An examination of the symbiotic relationship of the entertainment business and the media; press coverage of the entertainment industry; Hollywood’s relationship with news media.

JOUR 404 Produce and Host Sports Content in Studio A (2 units)

Description: Interview, present and design sports segments for television/video in Studio A.

JOUR 422 Visual Journalism for Non-Majors (4 units)

Description: Emphasis on photographic storytelling in print, video and Web-based media; understanding of visual thinking and imagery techniques.

JOUR 432 Sports Commentary (4 units)

Description: Techniques of reporting and writing sports columns and commentary for print, video, radio and Web-based media.

JOUR 446 Entertainment Reporting (2 units)

Description: Techniques of reporting and writing about the entertainment business, economics and finances. Analysis of the skills and background needed for reporters specializing in this area of the news.

JOUR 469 Money, Markets and Media (4 units)

Description: Practical approach to understanding and writing about economic concepts through current events, case studies and historical examples.

JOUR 481 The Athlete, Sports Media and Popular Culture (4 units)

Description: Analysis of the images of the athlete and sports media helps us understand how sports dramatically affects such social issues as race, class and gender.

JOUR 489 Hands-on Disruption: Experimenting with Emerging Technology (2 units)

Description: Exploration and experimentation of emerging technologies through the lens of journalism and hands-on prototyping.

PUBLIC RELATIONS

PR 340 Introduction to Advertising (4 units)

Description: History and development of advertising; basic advertising campaigns showing relationships of marketing, creative, print and electronic media.

PR 343 Design and Production (4 units)

Description: Production of advertising materials; emphasis on the creation and design of advertising elements.

PR 478 Social Media Analytics: Data and Content Creation for Real-time Public Relations (4 units)

Description: Application of monitoring tools to become social media analysts and real-time content creators; interpretation of large data sets drawn from the social web; understanding of how to present data visually for optimal impact.

PR 487 Multimedia PR Content: Introduction to Audio/Video Tools (2 units)

Description: Hands-on lab; audio/video tools for conceiving, shooting, editing, delivering and archiving compelling stories for online audiences; personal brand building; digital storytelling trends and applications.

Thornton School of Music

COMPOSITION

MUCO 101x Fundamentals of Music Theory (2 units)

Description: An introductory course in music theory required for those majors in need of remedial training, and available to the general student who wishes to develop music writing skills. Not available for credit to B.M. and B.A. music majors. Recommended preparation: ability to read music.

JAZZ STUDIES

MUJZ 150 Beginning Jazz Improvisation (2 units)

Description: Development of beginning improvisational skills including underlying principles of theory, harmony, jazz ear training, and jazz style.

MUJZ 218a Afro-Latin Percussion Instruments (2 units)

Description: Instruction in the performance of percussion instruments associated with African, South American, and Caribbean music traditions, with special emphasis on adaptation to jazz music.

MUJZ 218b Afro-Latin Percussion Instruments (2 units)

Description: Instruction in the performance of percussion instruments associated with African, South American, and Caribbean music traditions, with special emphasis on adaptation to jazz music. Prerequisite: MUJZ 218a

MUJZ 450 Intermediate Jazz Improvisation (2 units)

Description: Development of intermediate improvisational skills including underlying principles of theory, harmony, jazz ear training, and jazz style. Recommended preparation: MUJZ 150.

MUSIC ENSEMBLE

MUEN 222 Trojan Marching Band (1 unit)

Description: Rehearsal and participation in performances for athletic and other university functions. Open to all students by audition. Graded CR/NC.

MUEN 305 Vocal Jazz Ensemble (1 unit)

Description: Study and performance of vocal ensemble literature from the Jazz idiom, with emphasis on improvisational techniques. Open to all students by audition. Graded CR/NC.

MUEN 307 University Chorus (1 unit)

Description: Rehearsal and performance of choral literature from all periods of music history. Open to all students. Graded CR/NC.

MUEN 308 USC Apollo Chorus (1 unit)

Description: The USC Apollo Chorus, a choir open to all students, faculty, and staff of any gender, performs tenor/bass repertoire.

MUEN 311 USC Oriana Choir (1 unit)

Description: The USC Oriana Choir, a choir open to all students, faculty, and staff of any gender, performs treble repertoire.

MUEN 322 Trojan Marching Band (1 unit)

Description: Continuation of MUEN 222. Graded CR/NC.

MUEN 324 University Band (1 units)

Description: Rehearsal and performance of standard repertoire. Open to all students by audition. Graded CR/NC.

MUEN 505 Vocal Jazz Ensemble (1 unit)

Description: Study and performance of vocal ensemble literature from the Jazz idiom, with emphasis on improvisational techniques. Open to all graduate students by audition. (Duplicates credit in MUEN 405.)

MUEN 507 University Chorus (1 unit)

Description: Rehearsal and performance of choral literature from all periods of music history. Open to all graduate students.

MUEN 508 USC Apollo Chorus (1 unit)

Description: The USC Apollo Chorus, a choir open to all students, faculty, and staff of any gender, performs tenor/bass repertoire.

MUEN 511 USC Oriana Choir (1 unit)

Description: The USC Oriana Choir, a choir open to all students, faculty, and staff of any gender, performs treble repertoire.

MUSIC INDUSTRY

MUIN 272x Basics of the Music Industry (4 units)

Description: Introductory survey of the music business. Topics include: copyright, record companies, contracts, music publishing, performance rights societies, managers, agents, and other artist team/income considerations. Not for major credit for music industry majors. (Duplicates credit in former MUIN 372ax.)

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

MTEC 277x Introduction to Music Technology (1 unit)

Description: A survey of the technology used to create, prepare, perform, and distribute music, with an emphasis on recording, MIDI, music production, mastering and Internet technologies. Not available for major credit to B.M. and B.S., Music Industry majors. (Duplicates credit in former MUIN 277.)

PERFORMANCE (GUITAR)

MPGU 120a Beginning Pop/Rock Guitar (2 units)

Description: Introduction to the performance technique of pop/rock guitar as well as music theory fundamentals, exploring repertoire by artists such as The Beatles and Dave Matthews.

MPGU 120b Beginning Pop/Rock Guitar (2 units)

Description: Introduction to the performance technique of pop/rock guitar as well as music theory fundamentals, exploring repertoire by artists such as The Beatles and Dave Matthews. Prerequisite: MPGU 120a and MUPF 120a

MPGU 121 Intensive Beginning Pop/Rock Guitar (4 units)

Description: Introduction to the performance technique of pop/rock guitar as well as music theory fundamentals, exploring repertoire by artists such as The Beatles and Dave Matthews. (Duplicates credit in MPGU 120abcd.)

MPGU 125 Beginning Fingerstyle/Chord Guitar (2 units)

Description: Basic fingerstyle guitar, learned through the study of such pieces as “Greensleeves,” “Malaguena,” and “Minuet” (Bach); song accompaniment patterns and music notation for the beginner.

MPGU 126 Easy Fingerstyle Beatles (2 units)

Description: Techniques of classical guitar applied to the study of five to eight Beatles songs, from “Hey Jude” to “Blackbird.” No guitar or music background required.

PERFORMANCE (KEYBOARD STUDIES)

MPKS 150a Beginning Piano (2 units)

Description: Techniques of performance, note reading, and basic musicianship. Not open to music majors.

MPKS 150b Beginning Piano (2 units)

Description: Techniques of performance, note reading, and basic musicianship. Not open to music majors. Prerequisite: MPKS 150a

MPKS 150c Beginning Piano (2 units)

Description: Techniques of performance, note reading, and basic musicianship. Not open to music majors. Prerequisite: MPKS 150b or MUPF 150b

PERFORMANCE (POPULAR MUSIC)

MPPM 120 Popular Music Performance I (2 units)

Description: Study of musical elements appropriate to the performance of popular music in a collaborative, interactive environment.

MPPM 240 Drumming Proficiency for the Popular Musician (2 units)

Description: Beginning and elementary instruction in drum set techniques.

MPPM 340 Intermediate Drum Set Proficiency (2 units)

Description: Intermediate level instruction in drum set performance including accompaniment techniques, fills, beat and brush patterns in jazz, Afro-Caribbean and Brazilian styles, interpreting drum charts. Recommended preparation: MPPM 240.

PERFORMANCE (VOCAL ARTS)

MPVA 141 Class Voice (2 units, max 4)

Description: Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing: breath control, tone production, diction, and the use of appropriate song material.

MPVA 412 Musical Theatre Workshop II (3 units)

Description: Stylistic and technical features of dramatic and musical elements involved in performance of American musical and standard operetta repertory; staging of scenes. Prerequisite: MPVA 402

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

MUSC 102gw World Music (4 units)

Description: Exploration of music and cultures of the world. Engagement with international musicians, global issues, field work and musical diasporas in Los Angeles.

MUSC 115gp Western Music as Sounding History (4 units)

Description: An introduction to Western art music and culture from the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern eras through reading, listening, analyzing and writing about music.

MUSC 200mgw The Broadway Musical: Reflections of American Diversity (4 units)

Description: A uniquely American genre, the Broadway musical serves as a catalyst for inquiry into human diversity, cross-culturalism, and significant social and political issues.

MUSC 210g Electronic Music and Dance Culture (4 units)

Description: The origins and development of EDM and its relatives such as disco, house, techno, rave and electronica, focusing on cultural and technological influences.

MUSC 250mgw The Music of Black Americans (4 units)

Description: A chronicle of the musical contribution of Africans and African Americans to American society and to the foundations of musical genres and styles throughout the world.

MUSC 320mgw Hip-hop Music and Culture (4 units)

Description: A history of hip-hop music from its inception to the present: its musical processes and styles, as well as attendant social, political and cultural issues.

MUSC 372g Music, Turmoil and Nationalism (4 units)

Description: An exploration of musical practices and styles which reflect and shape national identities and which focus on those created in response to political turmoil in many forms.

MUSC 422 The Beatles: Their Music and Their Times (4 units)

Description: Music, lyrics, recordings, production techniques, career strategy, social ramifications, and especially the technological impact of the musical group known as The Beatles.

MUSC 423 Classic Rock: Popular Music of the Sixties and Seventies (2 units)

Description: Critical examination of the lyrics, structure, associated mythology, technology, and evolving styles of popular music reflecting the turbulent societal changes during the Sixties and Seventies.

MUSC 424 Iconic Figures of Popular Music (2 units, max 8)

Description: Music, life, recordings, and attendant musical, cultural and political influences of a seminal musician or group in 20th or 21st century popular music.

Courses in summer session 1 (May 19 – June 29) will be taught mostly online. Some in-person courses will be offered in the summer session 2 (June 30 – August 10). To verify whether the course will be taught remotely or in-person, please locate the course in the Schedule of Classes and check under the Location column. Additional information regarding summer is available. Read more »